Mac Museum Year in Review: 2013

IMG_3929The last year has been a quiet one for the Mac Museum, at least in terms of articles, photos, and other materials posted to my website. In total, I only posted about seven articles. The boys became much more active this year and I started taking on extra responsibilities at work which severely limited my time to research, write, and post. While I didn’t spend much time working in museum, I did spend time acquiring for it. While I added fewer items than I did in 2012, I spent more money in total.

This spending increase was related to the addition of several rare Macs including a Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh, Color Classic, and PowerBook 2400c. Without these items I would have spent about 25% less than in 2012. That makes sense as I spent much of 2012 building a foundation for the museum. The majority of the items that I added in 2012 were common and easy-to-find, making them lower-cost. Now that I have filled my museum with the common items I wanted, I need to focus on more rare (and expensive) additions going forward.

I added 71 new items to the museum in 2013 which is just a few short of what I added in 2012. Many items were software, books, promotional materials, and accessories; only 14 were Macs. In addition to the rare pieces I mentioned before, these included a Flower Power iMac, a G4 Cube, a PowerMac 6100/60, a Mirror Drive Door G4, a 15″ and 20″ iMac G4, an iBook G4, a PowerBook G3 Pismo, an SE/30 (non-functional), a PowerMac 8600, and a Performa 6220CD. I finished collecting most of my Macworld magazines, gathering issues from 2006 – 2011. I still have a few holes here and there, the largest being 1994, 2009, and pre-1988. Other than that I have every U.S. issue ever printed (nearly 200 magazines).  Mid-year I went on a tangent collecting Iomega products such as Zip and Jaz drives because they are a big part of Mac history. In total I amassed about eight Iomega products. Towards the end of the year I began putting together an iPod collection, with the goal of having every iteration of the iPod that Apple manufactured.

The Mac Museum takes up about a quarter of my basement. I reorganized the space several times this year to make room for the things I was buying and to make it a little more organized. This summer I purchased three metal shelves that I use to store my desktop Macs which were previously stacked on top of each other on end tables and on the floor. The shelving makes them much easier to see and makes everything look nicer in general. This marked the addition of the “Mac Museum Annex” because two of the shelves are on the other side of the wall which is technically not part of the museum.

In addition to the large shelves I also purchased a book shelf to house my boxed software, boxed peripherals, CDs, floppies, and books. It’s in the corner and actually looks very professional. This week I added additional shelving to my cabinets to maximize storage space and added new hardware to spruce them up a bit. I also replaced some shelving with drawers and reorganized all of my various cables and accessories. The extra space has allowed me to clean off my corner desk and use it to showcase my Twentieth Anniversary Macintosh and has added more places for me to display Apple product packaging. Overall the museum area looks more clean and organized, perfect for a winter tour.

For 2014 I plan to continue searching for some of the more rare items and collect additional accessories, software, and documentation when it is priced well. I plan to make a pretty big dent in my iPod collection as well. Apple made many variations of the iPod so I have to be crafty about how I purchase them. To save money I’m not searching for working versions of all models; I want to have one representation of each generation that functions with the rest being broken in some way. I’m also trying to maximize my dollars by looking for auctions that contain multiple items to save on shipping. I may go on another tangent and start purchasing non-Apple devices such as Palm Pilots because they were a big part of the Mac ecosystem at one time. I intend to do all of this while spending less money than I did last year. Hopefully I’ll be able to spend a bit more time down there as well. We’ll see 🙂

It’s always fun to inventory what I have every now and then. I did one this week and here is what I have at the moment:

  • Almost 60 Macs; nearly all of them (except for 5) are functional
    • 6 of those Macs are iMac G3s in various colors (Blueberry, Tangerine, Indigo, Strawberry, Flower Power, and Graphite)
    • 2 of those Macs are iMac G4s (a 20″‘ and a 15″)
    • 17 of those are PowerBooks
  • 13 iPods, including a mini, a few nanos, and several shuffles
  • 30 mice, including almost every model (and color) of mouse that Apple has ever made
  • 29 keyboards, including every color of every keyboard for the iMac, an Apple Extended Keyboard (not the Extended II), an Apple Desktop Bus keyboard (introduced with the Apple IIgs), and an Apple Adjustable Keyboard
  • 4 monitors, including a 20″ LCD Studio Display with an ADC connector
  • A total of 32 boxed copies of software
    • Including 12 boxed copies of various versions of the Mac OS
  • A smattering of additional items including an eMate, a Newton Messagepad 130, Messagepad 2000, iSight Firewire camera, several Apple modems, a Portable StyleWriter, an original ImageWriter, an Apple QuickTake camera, and hundreds of promotional materials, brochures, advertisements, and manuals.

A lot has been happening in the museum in terms of acquisitions and organization, but little has made it to the web side of the world. It’s been a fun year and I’ve collected a bunch of really cool stuff. Now I just need time to play with it all.

One Reply to “Mac Museum Year in Review: 2013”

  1. It is very good that you have this collecting hobby and avid interest to help balance your hectic life in a positive and enjoyable way!
    Down time and pursuing our interests & passions are very important pieces to our sanity puzzle.
    I am glad you have these pieces available to you!

    Like

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